The Wabi Sabi Edge

Ideas, Riffs And (Some) Noise On All Things Marketing. Branded

The Ise Grand Shrine – a Shinto Shrine – in Ise, Mie prefecture in Japan has been preserved exactly like it was around 2,000 years ago. Despite such a rich legacy, the UNESCO has refused to list the shrine in its list of historic places.

Why?

Shinto Shrine

(Shinto priests walking beside the Ise Grand Shrine, Japan. Source)

This is because the shrine is not built of a ‘permanent structure’. The ISe Grand Shrine is built of wood and hence it  gradually loses its structural integrity over years. So the Shinto priests have a solution;  every 20 years they tear down the structure and rebuild another – in an adjacent plot –  in exactly the same specifications as the original using the wood from the same forest that the original structure was built from. Result: the shrine  is  forever new,  ancient and original! The present structure, dating from 1993, is the 61st iteration…

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Let Go, Accept, Move On

Sonia's Palate

Once upon a time,
There were two hotels:
the Waldorf and the Astoria
from the family of Astor
A premiere hotel 
Was born from the two:
the first to offer room service-- 
a historic place 
where several historical figures stayed
most significant of those--
Ms. Monroe, herself!
One afternoon,late Summer 
an idea was born
a celebration declared:
NYC, Broadway, the Waldorf Astoria

Yeah, yeah, yeah!
Broadway, the Waldorf Astoria
we yelped.

Tickets were bought,
Rooms were booked,
we waited.

Two months had passed,
but the time had arrived,
we were to check,
check into the hotel.

We entered with glee,
skipping up the staircase
like Americans in Europe, 
we walked in gawking
the walls, 
the ceilings
memorizing it all--
a historical moment.

Just then we entered,
A small, small room--
Old and expensive
Two beds;
carpet 
from a time 
long, long ago

This is it? I thought Where's the magic…

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Creating Ourselves: Identity

Cats and Chocolate

IMG_3896

Identity is fascinating. If we didn’t find it fascinating, there would be no interviews, no memoir, no ‘I’, as such. To identify each other, we talk about interests, beliefs, our dreams, our likes and dislikes, our passions. We talk about where we think we belong, what our past has been, what our present is, and where we think we’re going. Or we are ‘rebels’ in some sense of the word – setting ourselves apart from the culture we grew up in, or apart from the culture that people attribute to us.

It fascinates me because I’ve noticed that my identity has shifted, along with how I define myself at any one time. I used to define myself by what I consumed: my favourite TV series, my taste in music, what I wore.

Nowadays identity is something I consider deeper, rooted in a sense of my experiences and how I’ve responded…

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